sore throat

  • Humble Herbs Worth Their Weight in Gold

    Written by Suzanne M. Diamond, M.Sc.

    Four humble herbs with an impressive history for helping people to improve their health and overcome disease include burdock root (Arctium lappa L.), sheep sorrel herb (Rumex acetosella L.), Indian rhubarb root (Rheum officinale L.) and slippery elm bark (Ulmus rubra Muhl.). A traditional herbal formulation made with these four herbs is gaining recognition as a good remedy for treating a wide range of health problems. The below information covers some of the impressive research on these four herbs and helps to shed light on how this synergist blend can afford so many profound health benefits.

    BURDOCK ROOT(Arctium lappa L.) Not far from your doorstep, if you look, you can usually find the soft green leaves of burdock, common in most neighborhoods— and based on much scientific and historical data, the root of this plant can dramatically enhance your health by boosting your immune system, improving digestion and thwarting cancer in many different ways. Regularly incorporating burdock root in your daily regime may even be able to increase your lifespan based on anti-aging results found with animals. There are many other documented and accepted health benefits of regularly drinking burdock root tea based on the German Pharmacopoeia, including the relief of gastrointestinal complaints and bone and joint conditions.

    Burdock root, also known as gobo or Poor-man’s potatoes, is an important food in Japan known for its many healing properties. Burdock root can safely be eaten as a root vegetable and is popularly eaten by Japanese people and sushi lovers of all nationalities. When grown in loamy soil, the root grows into a very long, creamy colored tap root similar in appearance to a carrot but much longer. It can grow deeper than most root veggies and is known as a good source of trace elements and minerals accessed from deeper soil layers. Unlike carrots and potatoes, burdock root does not contain starch it contains complex carbohydrates called fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) including 27–45 percent inulin. When people eat starchy roots, this causes a sharp rise in blood sugar and blood insulin levels. But burdock root provides the body with soluble fibers that do not affect blood sugar or blood insulin levels. This makes burdock root and FOS particularly beneficial for diabetics. FOS and inulin have many scientifically documented health benefits including acting as a beneficial prebiotic by feeding beneficial intestinal microflora (BIM) while also eliminating potential gut pathogens, optimizing colonic pH, boosting bone strength through increasing calcium and mineral absorption from food, supporting serum enterolactone and enterodiol concentrations, helping to control blood sugar levels and reducing cholesterol. Other foods that contain inulin include chicory root, onions, Jerusalem artichokes and bananas.

    According to Bengmark (2005), researching out of the Institute of Hepatology, University College, London Medical School, U.K., inulin has prebiotic qualities and can affect intestinal immune cells and potentially repair the gut wall and thereby improve overall immune function. Several recent scientific studies have documented significant immune-enhancing effects of inulin and oligofructose.

    Taking herbal formulas that contains burdock root, rich in natural oligofructose and inulin, have been found to afford many digestive benefits and favorable results have been shown with a number of digestive disorders according to Tamayo and colleagues (2000).

    SHEEP SORREL (Rumex acetosella L.) Sheep sorrel is a common herb found abundantly at roadsides and is otherwise known as sour grass because of its tart leaves. The leaves are popularly used in herbal teas for rejuvenating health and cleansing toxins from the body. Sheep sorrel has powerful phytoestrogen activity (phytoestrogen means plant-estrogen) based on in vitro studies conducted by U.S. hormone researcher, Dr. David Zava in 1998. Sheep sorrel came in tenth out of 150 herbs tested for phytoestrogen activity; the list was headed by soy beans, licorice root and red clover herb, all legumes wellknown for their phytoestrogen activity.

    Sheep sorrel is an important component of ESSIAC® tea and products, together with three other herbs, burdock root, slippery elm bark and Indian rhubarb root. Early research on sheep sorrel herb by famed Canadian nurse Rene M. Caisse and R.O. Fisher, M.D., in Ontario in the 1920s and 30s, found that sheep sorrel liquid extract given to mice with artificially induced tumors caused cancerous tumors to markedly regress and disappear. The other herbs in ESSIAC were said to help with cleansing and eliminating the dead cancer cells and other toxins from the system. Nurse Rene Caisse also reputedly had success with treating cancer patients with ESSIAC together with sheep sorrel extract—including one case cured and two cases improved accepted by a Cancer Commission set up by the Canadian Government in the 1939. There are many more anecdotal reports and some well documented cases of success with ESSIAC for dramatically improving people’s health very quickly.

    Human clinical studies with other phytoestrogen-rich foods and herbs, such as flaxseed and red clover, have also produced profound anti-cancer results. For instance, clinical studies with breast cancer patients given muffins containing 50 grams of ground flaxseed daily (flaxseed contains phytoestrogens called lignans in its seed coat) versus placebo muffins (without flaxseed) conducted by Dr. Paul Goss, Dr. Lilian Thompson and colleagues in 2000 at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, Canada, and a further clinical study conducted by these same researchers with post-menopausal breast cancer patients taking 25 grams of flaxseed daily documented significant anti-cancer effects within 30 to 40 days. A study done with a prostate cancer patient in Australia reported by Dr. Fredrick O. Stevens (1997) and a further randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study with prostate cancer patients conducted by Dr. Jarred and colleagues in England (2002) using red clover isoflavonoid extracts (160 mg/daily for only seven days in the case study and for 30–40 days in the clinical trial) have documented strong anti-cancer effects for red clover isoflavonoid phytoestrogens within days/weeks based on tumorectomies. There were no serious negative side effects noted in any of these studies.

    Foods and herbs rich in phytoestrogens, such as flaxseed (lignans), burdock root (isoflavones), burdock seed (lignans), milk thistle seed (lignans), red clover (isoflavones), soybean (isoflaonves), kudzu root (isoflavones), etc., once eaten, are metabolized within the gut by beneficial intestinal bacteria and the isoflavonoids and lignans that they contain significantly increase serum enterolactone and enterodiol concentrations. According to research conducted by the Australian company, Novogen, certain phytoestrogen metabolites function to inhibit anti-apoptosis proteins in cancer cells thereby causing cancer cells to go through apoptosis or programmed cell death without harming normal cells. Simply put, phtoestrogen-rich foods and extracts can cause cancer cells to simply die and be cleansed from the body without causing terrible side effects. Many phytoestrogens have also been shown to stimulate beneficial anti-cancer enzymes. The powerful and safe anti-cancer activity of phytoestrogen-rich foods and herbs may help to explain the myriad anecdotal reports of spontaneous remissions in cancer patients and miracle cancer cures documented over the centuries with various herbs and herbal combinations. More research is needed in this area to clearly define the anti-cancer activity of different phytoestrogens.

    Many foods, herbs and supplements contain beneficial phytoestrogens and other natural anti-cancer compounds that help to balance hormones in different ways. Sheep sorrel appears to be one that may have great promise for cancer patients. Further human clinical studies with sheep sorrel are needed to confirm the beneficial estrogen modulating and anti-cancer activity of its phytoestrogens and other active ingredients.

    SLIPPERY ELM INNER BARK
    (Ulmus fulva Michx. and U. rubra Muhl.) Slippery elm bark has a long history of use as a medicine and also as a food that can be eaten like gruel and is commonly made into lozenges for sore throats and coughs. The inner bark of this tree has been used as folk remedy for treating cancer and other conditions including: respiratory problems, throat irritation, fever, abscesses, dysentery, urinary and kidney inflammations.

    Choi and colleagues (2002) at Pusan National University in Korea studied slippery elm bark and found that it exhibited dose-dependent peroxynitrite scavenging activities. According to Langmead and colleagues (2002) at the Academic Department of Adult and Paediatric Gastroenterology, London, U.K., slippery elm bark also exhibited potent antioxidant activity using in vitro tests based on chemiluminescence used to detect herbal effects on generation of oxygen radicals by mucosal biopsies from patients with active ulcerative colitis. These researchers concluded that slippery elm and other herbal extracts merit formal evaluation as novel therapies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Lans, Turner, Khan and Bauer (2007) report the use of Ulmus fulva Michx. in ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in pigs and pets in British Columbia, Canada. The authors note that Ulmus fulva, along with other plants used for this purpose, have mid- to high-level validity for their ethnoveterinary use as anthelmintics (deworming agents).

    Five case studies of patients with psoriasis following a dietary regimen including a pinch of slippery elm bark taken daily with meals found relief of symptoms according to Brown and colleagues (2004) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, U.S. The five psoriasis cases, ranging from mild to severe at the study onset, improved on all measured outcomes over a six-month period.

    INDIAN RHUBARB ROOT
    (Rheum officinale L.)
    Michael Castleman in his book, Medicinal Herbs describes rhubarb (medicinal rhubarbs, Rheum officinale and R. palmatum; and garden rhubarb, R. rhaponticum noted as having similar but less powerful action) as an odd plant: its roots are medicinal; its stems make tasty pies but its leaves are poisonous. He also notes that Chinese physicians have used rhubarb root since ancient times prescribing it externally as a treatment for cuts and burns and internally in small amounts for dysentery while large amounts have powerful laxative action. Formerly, the root was an important drug in many army camps, said to stop dysentry in its tracks. The active ingredients of Indian rhubarb root include emodin and aloe-emodin, rhein and other anthracene derivatives.

    Conclusion: According to many studies, adding a time-tested herbal formula with these humble herbs to your daily menu may bring a boon to your health resulting in many immediately noticeable benefits to your well-being.

    Formal clinical trials are warranted to evaluate the real anticancer effects of formulas containing these four herbs. Such clinical studies need to be carefully designed, placebo controlled clinical trials with cancer patients scheduled for tumorectomies but not receiving chemo or radiation, in order to avoid confounding variables from these treatments (i.e. similar in design to studies assessing the anticancer effects of flaxseed and red clover).

    For references send a S.A.S.E. to totalhealth.

  • November 2017

    Total Health Magazine November 2017

    Dear Readers,

    Welcome to the November 2017 issue of TotalHealth Magazine Online.

    Dallas Clouatre's, PhD, article, "Nutrient Combining," discusses the French Paradox with the large percentage of the French diet in fats and the French having fewer cases of coronary heart disease and, in actuality, remain ambulatory longer than us Americans. Comparing the diets of both French and Americans in several instances of food/nutrient combinations leaving us with food for thought.

    Elson Haas, MD, in, "The 5 Keys to Staying Healthy," gives us a rare view of what makes the doctor tick. "Encourage and teach ways of health, and not just treat disease are part of my medical practice and teaching." The Five Keys are Nutrition, Exercise, Stress, Sleep and Attitude —Haas shows us how to use this simple and practical guide for taking our health care into our own hands on a day-to-day basis.

    Hyla Cass, MD, and Mikayla Kemp, BS, contribute an overview "Cannabis and Its Effects on Skin Conditions" of Dr. Phillip Blair, MD, Ret. COL, presentation at the recent Cannabis World Conference and Business Exposition in Los Angeles. An international consultant on medical uses of CBD, Dr. Blair geared this presentation to the effects CBD can have on such conditions as acne, psoriasis, and even skin cancer.

    Gene Bruno, MS, MHS, RH(AHG), in "Treating the Common Cold And Sore Throat," is aiding readers who have suffered stuffy nose, watery eyes, low fever, aching, and possibly a sore throat and those having escaped the symptoms. Suggestions include supplementation with vitamin C, zinc lozenges, Echinacea, vitamin A, and a homeopathic remedy for colds.

    If you are looking for a change in a pudding desert for this holiday season try Gloria Gilbère's, "Tembleque (Coconut Pudding)—A Dairy-Free South American Delight." Accompanying the recipe is a description of each of the healthy ingredients along with festive photos.

    Shawn Messonnier, DVM, consults this month on, "Colloidal Silver For Infections In Pets." Reminding us to always consult with our veterinarian before supplementing our pets' diet.

    In "Hemp Extract and Women's Health, How the Medicinal Discoveries of The Hemp Plant Are Transforming Women's Health," Sherrill Sellman, ND, explains why women are more challenged when it comes to their hormonal and over all health than men. Presenting a primer on the Endocannbindoid System for us—the immense healing potential of the non-psychoactive component of the hemp plant.

    "Treating Infertility—Information For Couples" Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, gives good news there are many natural ways to improve all steps of the reproductive process. With this advice you may save the $30,000 plus fees charged by infertility clinics.

    Best in health,

    TWIP The Wellness Imperative People

    Click here to read the full October issue.

    Click here to read the full October issue.

  • Silver Lozenges For Healing Your Mouth and Throat Naturally

    SilverBiotics Silver Lozenges Sherrill Sellman

    If you ever had a sore throat, then you know that it is no fun! Your throat is tender and painful, as well as feeling scratchy and burning. A really severe sore throat can even make swallowing or talking rather painful.

    Sore throats are a common malady prompting more than 13 million visits to the doctor’s offices each year.1

    But sore throats are not as straightforward as you may think. Sore throats are divided into three types, depending on which part of the throat is affected. One type is called pharyngitis which affects the area right behind at the mouth. Another version is tonsillitis, which is the swelling and redness of the tonsils, the soft tissue in the back of the mouth. And then there is laryngitis, the swelling and redness of the voice box, or laryngitis.

    Sore Throats are Tricky to Diagnose
    Unfortunately, not all sore throats are the same, which makes them tricky to diagnose. Some sore throats are caused by a bacterial infection and others are viral in origin. About 90 percent of sore throats are the first sign or symptom of a viral infection that then turns into a cold or flu. The discomfort of a sore throat will generally disappear after a day or two to be followed by the typical flu symptoms, i.e., runny nose, congestion, cough, red or watery eyes and sneezing.

    The other type of sore throat, called a strep throat, is due to a streptococcus bacterial infection. Strep throats cause the throat and tonsils to be inflamed and painful. This type of sore throat may last two weeks or more, making swallowing and talking difficult. While strep throats are commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 5 to 15, adults are by no means immune. Unlike a sore throat that is from a virus, a strep throat is a highly contagious bacterial infection spread by sneezing, coughing, sharing foods and drinks, etc.

    Another throat problem can be laryngitis, the inflammation of the voice box, or larynx, an organ in your upper neck just beyond the back of your throat. There are both infectious and noninfectious causes of laryngitis. However, the most common cause of laryngitis is a viral infection that lasts about one to two weeks.

    The non-infectious form of laryngitis can come from straining the vocal cords due to singing, talking or shouting. Breathing in chemical pollutants can also causes irritation and inflammation of the larynx.

    Loss of Voice
    Excessively loud, prolonged and improper use of the voice can lead to strained vocal cords. This occupational hazard of overuse or misuse of vocal cords is a common problem for singers and professional speakers (and overly enthusiastic sports fans) resulting in hoarseness or temporary loss of their voice. Even coughing can irritate and inflame the vocal cords causing a sore throat and hoarse voice.

    Other Health Issue Affecting the Mouth
    Several conditions can also lead to problems in the mouth. A mouth ulcer, also known as canker sore, is a small painful lesion that develops in your mouth or at the base of your gums. Although they usually disappear after a week or two, and are not considered infectious or dangerous, they can certainly make eating, drinking, and even talking very uncomfortable. While there seems to be no definite causes, some of the potential triggers include nutritional deficiencies, stress, viral or bacterial infections, and food sensitivities.

    Another common mouth problem is dry mouth, or the lack of adequate saliva production. Contrary to popular belief, dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. It is, however, the result of compromised functioning of your saliva glands.

    Medications often list dry mouth as a recognized side effect. In fact, there are more than 500 prescriptions and overthe- counter medications that cause dry mouth.2 Other causes include dehydration, mouth breathing, autoimmune diseases and radiation treatments for cancer.

    Adequate saliva helps prevent tooth decay by neutralizing acids produced by bacteria, limiting bacterial growth and washing away food particles. Saliva also enhances the ability to taste. Lack of saliva will reduce the presence of enzymes, which are necessary for proper digestion. A persistent dry mouth condition can, therefore, be the source of many health issues.

    Silver Biotics and Manuka Honey—A Powerful Duo for the Mouth and Throat
    When it comes to the health concerns affecting our mouth and throat, there are, in fact, few safe and effective pharmaceutical options. The viral form of strep throat has no medical interventions while antibiotics are prescribed for the bacterial version, increasing the risk of antibiotic resistance.

    Most cases of laryngitis or strained vocal cords are cured by resting the voice and limiting talking. While canker sores and dry mouth remain a serious problem for many people, there are only limited solutions available for resolving these problems.

    The powerful duo of SilverSol® nano-silver and New Zealand Manuka honey, found in the new Silver Biotics® Silver Lozenges, is the latest breakthrough formula by American Biotech Labs LLC. This unique product has the proven ability to resolve throat irritation, while at the same time soothing hoarseness and strained vocal cords and increasing saliva production. It is formulated with a high concentration of SilverSol at 60 parts per million(ppm) for effective throat soothing action.

    The Proven Benefits of SilverSol Technology
    For thousands of years, various forms of silver solutions have been used for a wide variety of issues. Even the famous Greek healer, Hippocrates, praised silver for its ability to promote healing and improve recovery rates.

    American Biotech Labs (winner of numerous medical innovation awards) has developed one of the most effective nano-silver technologies in the world. They currently hold more than 400 independent studies/test series from more than 60 different private, US government, military and also university labs, on their products.

    Their innovative scientific, published medical reports have challenged some of the greatest scientists in the world, covering topics such as HIV, Malaria, Bird Flu, Influenza A (H3N2), MRSA, VRE, and numerous other problem pathogens. As evidence of safety and efficacy, their innovative silver products have received numerous government clearances and approvals from around the world.

    Manuka Honey—Nature's Most Powerful Honey
    Raw honey is truly a healing balm. Its wound healing benefits have been know for thousands of years. Raw honey is known for its potent antiviral and antibacterial properties.

    Manuka honey has been proven to be a far superior form of honey. Manuka honey is made from bees pollinating the flowers of the Manuka bush, which grows wild in New Zealand. The Manuka Bush, Leptospermum species of the shrub, contains exceptionally strong antibacterial compounds.

    What makes Manuka honey even more powerful for healing is the discovery that its nutritional content is up to four times that of normal flower honey. Research has found there are two main components of Manuka, which gives it so many health benefits:

    • Hydrogen peroxide, a naturally occurring antibiotic found in all honey
    • Methylglyoxal (MG) a powerful antibiotic compound found in large amounts in Manuka honey

    It is the MG compound that sets Manuka honey apart from other types of honey. MG is much more stable than hydrogen peroxide and won't lose its antibacterial properties when exposed to light and heat. For example, Manuka honey has been shown to have 100 times more MG than other conventional honeys and effective against 60 species of bacteria.3

    A special global standard was created to identify and measure the antibacterial strength of Manuka honey. This Unique Manuka Factor (UMF) rating insures the medicinal strength of the honey being sold. Only New Zealand honey from the Manuka bush is eligible to receive this rating.

    Based on the UMF rating system, a UMF number of at least 5 guarantees therapeutic amounts of the antibacterial properties of hydrogen peroxide and Methylglyoxal in a Manuka honey product.

    Beyond it antibacterial effects, Manuka honey is renown for healing sore and inflamed throats, heals mouth ulcers, helps strep throats from either viral or bacterial infections, soothes hoarse throats and moistens dry mouth.

    The Dynamic Synergy of Silver Biotics and Manuka Honey
    There is no doubt about it. The synergy of SilverSol Technology. and Manuka Honey (UMF) in the Silver Biotic Silver Lozenges makes a powerful one two punch for the many challenges for a healthy mouth and throat. This dynamic combination soothes sore throats and laryngitis (due to hoarse or strained vocal cords), and is beneficial for dry mouth issues.

    Aside from the many medicinal benefits, Silver Biotics Silver Lozenges are a great way to support and enhance your immune system. Since they are formulated with a 60 ppm concentration of SilverSol Nano-Silver, they can also be taken to strengthen and enhance your immunity!

    So, whether you desire added protection during flu season or want to stay healthy while traveling on airplanes, etc, Silver Biotics Silver Lozenges should be a part of your preventative plan.

    Silver Biotics Silver Lozenges are made with certified New Zealand Manuka honey (UMF10) guaranteed for purity and potency. The natural mint flavoring also gives the lozenges a great taste! All the ingredients are organic and natural as well as free of gluten, soy and nuts!

    Once again we have to thank nature for a safe and effective solution to the many health challenges affecting our mouth and throat. Silver Biotics Silver Lozenges should always be at the ready whenever there is the very first sign of a tickle, cough or hoarseness! But also remember, they are a healthy treat for you and your immune system!

    References:

    1. PLoS One. 2014; 9(11): e111727. Rapid Antigen Group A Streptococcus Test to Diagnose Pharyngitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    2. Plemons JM, et al. "Managing xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction: executive summary of a report from the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs." J Am Dent Assoc. 2014 Aug;145(8):867¡V73. doi:10.14219/jada.2014.4
    3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Pmc/Articles/PMC3065476/
  • Treating the Common Cold and Sore Throat

    Treating the Common Cold and Sore Throat Gene Bruno

    Most people contract one or more colds every year. A cold is caused by viruses that infect cells of the upper respiratory tract. Since there are over 200 different species and strains of these viruses, a cold caused by one virus does not protect a person from catching a cold cause by a different one. This explains why colds can occur one after another or several times a year. An acute sore throat, on the other hand can be caused by a viral or bacterial infection. If your sore throat gets worse no matter what you do, it’s probably bacterial and may require a trip to the doctor for an antibiotic. The well-known symptoms of a cold include stuffy nose, watery eyes, low fever, aching, and possibly a sore throat.

    Conventional medical treatment for a cold generally involves rest, aspirin, decongestants, and drinking a lot of fluids. Conventional medical treatment for a sore throat also involves rest, aspirin, lots of fluids, and sometimes antibiotics. An integrative approach may also include supplementation with vitamin C, zinc lozenges, Echinacea, vitamin A, and a homeopathic remedy for colds.

    Vitamin C
    Since the late, great Nobel Laureate, Linus Pauling first discussed that megadoses of vitamin C might be an effective treatment for the common cold, the medical world has published study after study attempting to prove or disprove Pauling’s claim. In some cases, the studies were flawed since the amounts of vitamin C used were hardly megadoses, and were not sufficient to elicit a response.

    Placebo-controlled studies have shown that vitamin C supplementation decreases the duration and severity of common cold infections. However, the magnitude of the benefit has substantially varied, hampering conclusions about the clinical significance of the vitamin. In one published review, 23 studies with regular vitamin C supplementation were analyzed to find out factors that may explain some part of the variation in the results. It was found that on an average, vitamin C produces greater benefit for children than for adults. Perhaps of greatest significance, the dose also affects the magnitude of the benefit, there being on average greater benefit from at least 2000 mg daily compared to 1000 mg daily. For example, in five studies with adults administered 1000 mg daily of vitamin C, the median decrease in cold duration was only six percent, whereas in two studies with children administered 2000 mg daily, the median decrease was four times higher, 26 percent. The studies analyzed in this review used regular vitamin C supplementation. The authors of the review, however, noted that, “it is conceivable that therapeutic supplementation starting early at the onset of the cold episode could produce comparable benefits.”1

    In fact, this is exactly what took place in a recent study involving 252 adult subjects with a cold or flu who were treated with hourly doses of 1000 mg of vitamin C for the first six hours, and then three times daily thereafter. A control group of 463 subjects were treated with pain relievers and decongestants. The results were that overall reported flu and cold symptoms in the vitamin C group decreased 85 percent compared with the control group after the administration of megadose Vitamin C. The researchers in this study concluded: “Vitamin C in megadoses administered before or after the appearance of cold and flu symptoms relieved and prevented the symptoms in the test population compared with the control group.”2

    I’ve also found effective results with the common cold when supplementing with higher doses of vitamin C. I recommend 1000–2000 mg every two hours (reduce dose if experiencing loose bowels).

    Zinc Lozenges
    Zinc’s role in immune function is well established.3 The use of zinc in a lozenge form for the treatment of the common cold is also gaining validity. In one randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, the treatment of the common cold with zinc lozenges resulted in a significant reduction in duration of symptoms of the cold. The zinc group had significantly fewer days with coughing, headache, hoarseness, nasal congestion, nasal drainage, and sore throat. Cold symptoms were over in 4.4 days in the zinc group compared with 7.6 days in the placebo group.4

    Echinacea
    Echinacea is an immune stimulant/supporter, and is excellent in the prevention and treatment of colds and influenza. Research suggests that Echinacea supports the immune system by activating white blood cells (lymphocytes and macrophages).5 In addition, Echinacea appears to increase the production of interferon, which is important to the immune response of viral infections.6 In any case, a number of double-blind, clinical studies have confirmed Echinacea's effectiveness in treating colds and flu.7,8,9,10,11 However, some research suggests that Echinacea may be more effective if used at the onset of these conditions.12,13

    In addition, the results of a published study involving 238 subjects confirmed that Echinacea was safe and effective in producing a rapid improvement of cold symptoms. In the subgroup of patients who started therapy at an early phase of their cold, the effectiveness of Echinacea was most prominent.14 In a similar study, 246 subjects with a cold were treated with Echinacea preparations or a placebo. Those treated with the Echinacea preparations experienced a reduction of symptoms, significantly more effective than the placebo. The researchers concluded that the Echinacea preparations, "represent a low-risk and effective alternative to the standard symptomatic medicines in the acute treatment of common cold." 15

    Homeopathic Remedy For Colds
    In one clinical study, 170 soldiers suffering from the common cold were treated with either a combination homeopathic preparation, or aspirin. On the 4th and 10th treatment days, both the homeopathic remedy and the aspirin were found to possess comparative effectiveness in the treatment of the common cold.16 Another study involving 53 outpatients suffering from common cold found similar results.17

    Vitamin A
    Vitamin A's role in maintaining healthy epithelial tissue helps to fight infection by preventing the invasion of bacteria or viruses. In addition, children with even mild vitamin A deficiency develop respiratory infections and diarrhea at two and three times the rate of children with normal vitamin A status.18

    common cold treatments


    References

    1. Hemila H, Med Hypotheses (1999) 52(2):171–8.
    2. Gorton HC, Jarvis K, J Manipulative Physiol Ther (1999) 22(8):530–3.
    3. Whitney E, Cataldo C, Rolfes S, "Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition," Fifth Edition (1998) West/Wadsworth, Belmont, California, p.463–4.
    4. Mossad SB, et al, Ann Intern Med (1996) 125(2):81–8.
    5. See DM, Broumand N, Sahl L, Tilles JG. In vitro effects of echinacea and ginseng on natural killer and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity in healthy subjects and chronic fatigue syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Immunpharmacol 1997;35:229–35.
    6. Leuttig B, Steinmuller C, Gifford GE, et al. Macrophage activation by the polysaccharide arabinogalactan isolated from plant cell cultures of Echinacea purpurea. J Natl Cancer Inst 1989;81:669–75.
    7. Melchart D, Linde K, Worku F, et al. Immunomodulation with Echinacea—a systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Phytomedicine 1994;1:245–54.
    8. Dorn M, Knick E, Lewith G. Placebo-controlled, double-blind study of Echinacea pallida redix in upper respiratory tract infections. Comp Ther Med 1997;5:40–2.
    9. Hoheisel O, Sandberg M, Bertram S, et al. Echinacea shortens the course of the common cold: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Eur J Clin Res 1997;9:261–8.
    10. Braunig B, Dorn M, Knick E. Echinacea purpurea root for strengthening the immune response to flu-like infections. Zeitschrift Phytotherapie1992;13:7–13.
    11. Brikenborn RM, Shah DV, Degenring FH. Echinaforce® and other Echinacea fresh plant preparations in the treatment of the common cold. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. Phytomedicine 1999;6:1–5.
    12. Melchart D, Walther E, Linde K, et al. Echinacea root extracts for the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections: A double-blind, placebocontrolled randomized trial. Arch Fam Med 1998;7:541–5.
    13. Grimm W, Müller HH. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of fluid extract of Echinacea purpurea on the incidence and severity of colds and respiratory tract infections. Am J Med 1999;106:138–43.
    14. Henneicke-von Zepelin H, et al, Curr Med Res Opin(1999) 15(3):214–27.
    15. Brinkeborn RM, Shah DV, Degenring FH, Phytomedicine (1999) 6(1):1–6.
    16. Maiwald VL, et al, Arzneimittelforschung (1988) 38(4):578-82.
    17. Gassinger CA, Wunstel G, Netter P, Arzneimittelforschung (1981) 31(4):732–6.
    18. Whitney E, Cataldo C, Rolfes S, "Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition," Fifth Edition (1998) West/Wadsworth, Belmont, California, p.