Optimizing Cognitive Function

  • January 2018

    Total Health Magazine December 2017

    Dear Readers,

    Welcome to the January 2018 issue of TotalHealth Magazine Online.

    Dallas Clouatre's, PhD, article, "Probiotics For Digestive Health," answers many questions on probiotics, what they are, why we need them and how to select them. Best described by the following quote: {For instance, according to Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College London and director of the British Gut Microbiome project, a "healthy gut is like a perfect English garden. You've got a diversity of microbes of all types, all living together and feeding off each other's byproducts—nothing is wasted."}

    This is part two of a two-part series on Coenzyme Q10 (See part one TotalHealth December 2017 page 10) titled "Coenzyme Q10: The New Era," by Ross Pelton, RPh, CCN and William V. Judy, PhD. "Coenzyme Q10's dual functions (antioxidant & energy production) make it essential for the health of virtually all human tissues and organs. As a fat-soluble antioxidant, it protects proteins (like LDL-cholesterol), enzymes, fats (all cell walls/membranes) and especially DNA from free radical damage. In terms of energy production, areas of the body with high rates of metabolic activity (high energy demands) such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain and immune system are especially sensitive to low levels of CoQ10." Read on for the full update.

    Ann Louise Gittleman, PhD, CNS, in "Bile: Your New BFF," brings an important and not often discussed system of the workings of the human body. Bile is produced by the liver to the tune of about one quart per day, bile is made from lecithin, cholesterol and bilirubin. The body stores it in the gallbladder, and moves it to the intestines during digestion. After reading about the process you'll understand why Gittleman refers to it as your new best friend forever.

    "Optimizing Cognitive Function—Foods And Supplements," Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, describes our brain as our body's motor. Our brain consumes 10 times as much energy for its size as the rest of our body. "So what we feed it determines whether it purrs like a Ferrari, or runs in fits and starts." Teitelbaum includes the top four foods and supplements to feed your brain.

    Elson Haas, MD, in this month's article, "A Smart Start To Your New Year The Health Benefits Of Seasonal Detox," emphasizes detox approach to improving your health. Haas has been leading and participating in detox programs during his thirty-one years in medical practice. This Detox program begins in January 2018.

    Gene Bruno, MS, MHS, RH(AHG), "Complementary And Alternative Treatments for Seasonal Allergies," describes what many of us experience as a congested, runny, itchy nose together with frequent sneezing and watery eyes that makes you feel miserable. If you are looking for a complementary and alternative treatment approach to allergies look no further. Bruno describes a full menu of supplements available to you.

    Gloria Gilbère's, CDP, DAHom, PhD, presents "Apple Cider Glazed Chicken with Sweet Potatoes." Inflammation-free, nightshade free recipes, there are many ways by which normal cells and tissues can be damaged, leading to inflammation. One important way is consuming nightshade foods because they contain a substance known to accelerate inflammation—Solanaceae or Solanine—alkaloid chemicals that can be highly toxic.

    Shawn Messonnier, DVM, consults this month on, "Hyperthyroidism in Pets." Reminding us to always consult with our veterinarian before supplementing our pets' diet.

    Best in health,

    TWIP The Wellness Imperative People

    Click here to read the full January issue.

    Click here to read the full January issue.

  • Optimizing Cognitive Function With Foods and Supplements

    Optimizing Cognitive Function With Foods and Supplements Jacob Teitelbaum MD People often ask me, "What are the best things I can do to improve cognitive function?"

    So here's how to get started.
    The key point to realize is that our brain is like our body's motor. It consumes 10 times as much energy for its size as the rest of our body. So what we feed it determines whether it purrs like a Ferrari, or runs in fits and starts, leaving us with "brain farts" through the day.

    So what are the key fuels that our brain needs, as they relate to diet?

    1. Eggs. One of the key memory molecules is called acetylcholine. To make this, our body requires that we take in about 500 mg of choline daily. Interestingly, when a woman does not have enough estrogen, as occurs during perimenopause and menopause, they are more likely to develop memory problems when they don't get enough choline. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/92/5/1113.full. This can be aggravated by certain genetic defects and can be a major player in cognitive dysfunction. The solution? Simply eat one or two eggs a day. Each egg supplies 680 mg of choline. Be sure to eat the egg yolk, as this is the part that has the choline. More good news? Numerous studies have now shown that eating eggs does not increase cholesterol or increase risk of heart disease. In fact, eggs have been shown to be a very healthy food.
    2. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, herring, sardines or mackerel. Most of our brain is made of the omega-3 oils found in fish.
    3. B vitamins and magnesium. These are the key nutrients needed to make energy. They can be found in whole unprocessed foods. For example almonds are a good source of magnesium, and you want your fresh veggies for the B vitamins.
    4. Up to two cups a day of coffee and tea, along with up to an ounce of chocolate daily also can have wonderful benefits for mental clarity.

    For the neurotransmitters, the choline for acetylcholine and to a lesser degree tyrosine to make dopamine would be most important for memory.

    It is especially important give the body the basic raw materials that it normally needs.

    In terms of supplements, the key items that I would recommend (and personally take myself ) are:

    1. Omega 3's—as upwards of 90 percent of the oils in most fish oil products are not Omega 3's, and are more likely to be toxic than helpful, I take one of Vectomega (EuroPharma) daily. This replaces seven large fish oil pills giving optimal support with one small pill.
    2. Energy Revitalization System (Enzymatic Therapy) vitamin powder. This supplies optimal levels of B vitamins, magnesium, amino acids (approximately 950 mg of tyrosine) and other nutrients needed to optimize brain function (including choline) in one low cost simple drink daily.
    3. I add one scoop (5 g) of SHINE ribose powder to the vitamin powder. For the first six weeks, I recommend taking it three times daily. Then it can often be dropped to 1–2 times a day. In our published study, ribose dramatically improved cognitive function in people with fibromyalgia by an average of 30 percent.
    4. I also add CuraMed 750 milligrams once daily for its overall brain and immune system benefits. So basically, for supplements the one Energy Revitalization System (Add a 5g scoop of SHINE Ribose) drink a day and one Vectomega is the best 30 seconds people can spend all day to optimize cognitive function.

    Cognitive Function Intensive Care
    For those with CFS and fibromyalgia, once the above aspects are addressed, the next step is to use the SHINE Protocol to optimize sleep, thyroid and adrenal function and orthostatic intolerance, as well as candida and other infections. The free Energy Analysis Program at www.vitality101.com can tailor the SHINE Protocol to your specific case with a simple 10-minute quiz. It can even assess pertinent lab tests if you have them available.

    Love and blessings,
    Dr. T